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ED 3945:   I was speaking in general terms, not specifically of a Union Pacific machine.  Steam wrecking derricks were common through the 1960's on American railroads.  Last one I saw in service was on the former Chicago, Burlington & Quincy/Burlington Northern in 1977. It was dispatched from it's normal Aurora, IL location to LaGrange, IL to help in the clean-up of an Amtrak wreck, wherein the Amtrak locomotives derailed on a bridge over the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad tracks. It was still steam-powered.

The last steam wreckers I saw were on the Southern Pacific Railroad, with 2 stationed at Truckee, CA (for use on the Sierra-Nevada mountans, running east from Truckee) and at Klamath Falls OR.  This was in 1999.

Would love to see more portrait photos of your UP wrecker!

 

 

 

@mark s posted:

ED 3945:   I was speaking in general terms, not specifically of a Union Pacific machine.  Steam wrecking derricks were common through the 1960's on American railroads.  Last one I saw in service was on the former Chicago, Burlington & Quincy/Burlington Northern in 1977. It was dispatched from it's normal Aurora, IL location to LaGrange, IL to help in the clean-up of an Amtrak wreck, wherein the Amtrak locomotives derailed on a bridge over the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad tracks. It was still steam-powered.

The last steam wreckers I saw were on the Southern Pacific Railroad, with 2 stationed at Truckee, CA (for use on the Sierra-Nevada mountans, running east from Truckee) and at Klamath Falls OR.  This was in 1999.

Would love to see more portrait photos of your UP wrecker!

 

 

 

Thanks for the explaining I like them very mutch saw one similar in the states.

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ED - Superb photos of your crane, and of the prototype. Most enjoyable!   As a side note, both the Burlington Route and the Colorado & Southern required that a wrecking derrick in transit must have the boom trailing the locomotive. That is to prevent a boom carried in the opposite/wrong direction from swinging out in front of an on-coming train. Presume other railroads had the same directive in effect.

The aluminum color really shows off the detail nicely on this model.......and on the prototype!

Trains Magazine had a photo spread many years ago of two similar derricks struggling to re-rail an overturned D&RGW L131 2-8-8-2. Despite having stabilizing cables planted 100' behind the cranes and clamps on the closest rail, when executing the lift, both cranes' outside wheels lifted off the rails!    Intriguing to ponder the immense weights and forces involved!

Okay, I stumbled on this thread yesterday and as you’ll see, there’s a Like on 95 percent of your pictures. Your attention to detail on scenery, trackwork, trees, weathering, structures, amazing selection of motive power, is amazing, and I must admit, 2 rail scale is truly Realistic. Santiago is a true O scaler, and a Eric Lindgren (possibly misspelled) is a truly O scaler with remarkable 3D art filled models on there respected railroads. I can say, this particular thread is one of the best grouping of pictures I’ve ever reviewed, and thank you for sharing your talents with us here on the OGR Forum. I’ve only been to one fellows O -Scale layout, Louis Ertz, (passed away several years ago) from Memphis Tennessee. He, like you and other O Scalers, was very focused on exact realism, everything had to fit, be colored correctly, properly placed for its exact purpose. So, just keep posting those beautiful pictures of your amazing layout. Question, are there any cities on your layout? I respect your great work. Thank You, and Happy Railroading..

Last edited by leapinlarry
@leapinlarry posted:

Okay, I stumbled on this thread yesterday and as you’ll see, there’s a Like on 95 percent of your pictures. Your attention to detail on scenery, trackwork, trees, weathering, structures, amazing selection of motive power, is amazing, and I must admit, 2 rail scale is truly Realistic. Santiago is a true O scaler, and a Eric Lundgren (possibly misspelled) is a truly O scaler with remarkable 3D art filled models on there respected railroads. I can say, this particular thread is one of the best grouping of pictures I’ve ever reviewed, and thank you for sharing your talents with us here on the OGR Forum. I’ve only been to one fellows O -Scale layout, Louis Ertz, (passed away several years ago) from Memphis Tennessee. He, like you and other O Scalers, was very focused on exact realism, everything had to fit, be colored correctly, properly placed for its exact purpose. So, just keep posting those beautiful pictures of your amazing layout. Question, are there any cities on your layout? I respect your great work. Thank You, and Happy Railroading..

Thank you, I wish it was that I can build a city but I don’t have the space to do it. But it will be fune to make big buildings like what I have seen in great ho layouts. 

Edwin, Thank You for replying, it’s  Saturday morning, 10:28 AM here in middle Tennessee, and I believe it is approximately 5:30 PM where you live. It’s amazing how our computers bring us so closely together. My mention of cites was just a curious question, I absolutely understand how much space an O scale layout takes up in one’s home. You have utilized your space nicely.  Again, it’s nice to meet you via the OGR Forum. I have visited Seoul Korea as my wife’s from Busan. We plan to travel, the Netherlands are on our list, Amsterdam. Your layout should be on the pages of OGR, THE MAGAZINE.  Have fun working on your railroad. Stay safe, stay healthy, enjoy your Railroading.  Leapin Larry

ED - Superb prototype photos.  As you noted, wrecking cranes all traveled with boom cars, to avoid poking holes in high cars. Your Union Pacific crane has a cut down passenger car as it's boom car. Generally, the "wreck train" was an assemblage of old cars which would include the boom car which would carry perhaps blocks of wood, auxiliary trucks and tools. Additionally there might be a reassigned tender for fuel and water, a box car for tools and blocks, a dining car, with picnic tables to feed the crew, plus  a kitchen, and finally, a dormitory car, for crew members to grab some sleep. The Burlington Route employed cabooses (waycars) on their wrecking outfits in the last years. The Burlington kept there derricks "hot", with live steam from roundhouse or shop sources, so that they would be ready to go at a moments notice. A fire would be built in the firebox en-route.

One quite appealing element to the Overland crane is that it is self propelled, just like the prototype. Again, your model is excellent!

@leapinlarry posted:

Edwin, Thank You for replying, it’s  Saturday morning, 10:28 AM here in middle Tennessee, and I believe it is approximately 5:30 PM where you live. It’s amazing how our computers bring us so closely together. My mention of cites was just a curious question, I absolutely understand how much space an O scale layout takes up in one’s home. You have utilized your space nicely.  Again, it’s nice to meet you via the OGR Forum. I have visited Seoul Korea as my wife’s from Busan. We plan to travel, the Netherlands are on our list, Amsterdam. Your layout should be on the pages of OGR, THE MAGAZINE.  Have fun working on your railroad. Stay safe, stay healthy, enjoy your Railroading.  Leapin Larry

Thanks, if you are planning to go to the Netherlands let me know.

@mark s posted:

ED - Superb prototype photos.  As you noted, wrecking cranes all traveled with boom cars, to avoid poking holes in high cars. Your Union Pacific crane has a cut down passenger car as it's boom car. Generally, the "wreck train" was an assemblage of old cars which would include the boom car which would carry perhaps blocks of wood, auxiliary trucks and tools. Additionally there might be a reassigned tender for fuel and water, a box car for tools and blocks, a dining car, with picnic tables to feed the crew, plus  a kitchen, and finally, a dormitory car, for crew members to grab some sleep. The Burlington Route employed cabooses (waycars) on their wrecking outfits in the last years. The Burlington kept there derricks "hot", with live steam from roundhouse or shop sources, so that they would be ready to go at a moments notice. A fire would be built in the firebox en-route.

One quite appealing element to the Overland crane is that it is self propelled, just like the prototype. Again, your model is excellent!

Thank you, I love to read what you writing so I know more about those cranes, thanks again.

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