put a little Santa Fe in your day...

ATSF caboose with wig wagDoug or anyone. (Number 90 you're also a Santa Fe guy Right?) could you expand a little bit more on the wig way communication device....

I'm guessing communications between the tail end crew and head end crew?

What would a white or red light indicate?   Thanks in advance.

Gregg posted:

Doug or anyone. (Number 90 you're also a Santa Fe guy Right?) could you expand a little bit more on the wig way communication device....

I'm guessing communications between the tail end crew and head end crew?

What would a white or red light indicate?   Thanks in advance.

Yes it was for communicating from the rear end crew to the head end crew. It was pivoted so that the wig wag was to the side of the coupola for the head end crew to see. The steam crew hanging their head out the window could see the lights to the side of the train. They were used to signal that the rear end was in the clear in a siding, or even that the brakes were set or released on the rear of the train. I have yet to find any instructions or portion of old rule books to explain how red or white was used to signal such things. It cost the ATSF $500 per caboose to have them installed.  

Despite what most people think, the lights were positioned to the center of the caboose, NOT the ends. The back of the wig wag faces the ends of the caboose.

There were 7 different style of wig wags produced from their inception. The one I produced and shown here (and most commonly shown) is Style #7 and the last version to be fabricated.

 

 

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