We will be on our way to WhiteFish, MT on the Empire Builder the middle of June. First class bedrooms both ways. Could use some helpful tips.

Mike mentioned forest fire burns.  That is one of the fascinating aspects of the road from the Yellowstone south entrance down to Jackson Hole.  When we were there two years ago , it was only a month or so after a major fire had closed the road for days.  We drove through a patchwork of burned areas and areas the fire had skipped over.  There were even rows of trees that were geen on one side and brown on the other.  Trees don't grow fast in that climate so you will still see the effects of the fire well.

There are exhibits along the road with amps and the history of fires in northwest Wyoming.  Something like 80 % of the land has had one or more fires in the last 200 years, most of them natural.  Old brush clearnace by fire seems to be an important part of the ecosystem.

A lot has changed, recent years, about western forest fires.  We spent 80 years suppressing fires/putting them out, only to realize that the fuel had increased dramatically.  When a fire started, the burn was more intense, in effect, scorching the earth, consuming everything, including the seeds needed, for re-growth.   Dramatic fire, 1988 Yellowstone, south.  First picture is an area with little re-growth, 25 years later.  Pacific Creek, to Gravel Creek,  US Forestry Wilderness area. 

 

Same fire a less intense burn, Sheffield trail head, US Forestry Wilderness area.  

27 Years of re-growth, 1988 Yellowstone fire. 

Recent policy, US Forestry Service, Dept of Agriculture, is to let wilderness fires burn, unless they threaten property.  

Last summer's fires, Glacier National Park, destroyed the Perry Chalet, a historic mountain top building, one of a few walk-in only chalets that remain.  Perry Chalet is currently being rebuilt.  There was an attempt to save the structure, the fire was more than limited resources could suppress. 

IMO Fire is a part of western life. IMO  Mike CT.   

Blackfoot River

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ver_Runs_Through_It_(film)

Clip from the article. 

Filming[edit]

 
The Redeemer Lutheran Church in Livingston, Montana, used for the Presbyterian church scenes.

Although both the book and movie are set in Missoula and on the Blackfoot River, it was filmed in late June, early July 1991 in south central Montana in Livingston and Bozeman,[2] and on the nearby upper YellowstoneGallatin, and Boulder Rivers. The waterfall shown is Granite Falls in Wyoming.[3][4] Filming was completed in early September 1991.

OK. back to the original thread.  I was hoping to go to Slovenia and Romania this summer, but my wife can't get off that long.   So the back up plan is to visit my kid in Seattle again, take his car down to Oregon, and climb Mt. Hood.  I was looking at the schedule for the Empire Builder.  Am I reading right--it departs Fargo at 3:30 in the morning?  Crying out loud!  Arrives in Seattle at 10:30am, that's OK.  Now, what about meals for first class?  Is it really great dining (3 chef prepared meals) like VIA in Canada?  No first class dome cars on the Empire Builder?  We could just as easily drive to Winnipeg and take VIA across to Vancouver, and then take the Cascade train down to Seattle, I think.  (Except we've done that already.)  Looks like a 33 hour trip (ha ha!) and only ~$1,000 for two adults if I'm reading this right?  I've been on several trains in Canada, Scotland/UK, Norway, Italia, but have not yet ridden Amtrak.

 

Kent in SD

In contento ed allegria

Notte e di vogliam passar!

As much as I like VIA Rail and their great food, they also have on time problems because of freight traffic.  If you are comparing train travel to other modes of transportation in North America. You probably won't be happy, take the train for adventure that it is and have a great time.

Enjoy the journey 

Clem

clem k posted:

As much as I like VIA Rail and their great food, they also have on time problems because of freight traffic.  If you are comparing train travel to other modes of transportation in North America. You probably won't be happy, take the train for adventure that it is and have a great time.

Enjoy the journey 

Clem

Yeah, that's how I look at it.  I was just wondering if it really would only cost me ~$1,000 for two people Fargo-->Seattle.  Also wondering if the food was any good and if there are three hot meals a day.  Don't want to be eating cold balogna sandwiches, LOL.  Wife & I both loved the VIA trip a couple of years ago, but it would involve another day of travel (drive to Winnipeg and then Cascade train Vancouver-->Seattle.)  It's also a thousand bucks per person for first class (the only way to go!)  Have so far avoided Amtrak.  I was looking forward to riding an overnight Eastern European train, but that will have to be put off until next year.

 

Kent in SD

In contento ed allegria

Notte e di vogliam passar!

18 years ago our family of four traveled cross-country in a giant figure-eight “All Aboard America” for about $1000. Food was good and the scenery was amazing. 

Prices have gone up and food quality down (so I’ve heard) but Amtrak can’t screw up the scenery so go for it!  

 

Promote Responsible Railfanning 

TWO23

Try Amtrak......I go at least once a year, west coast and back.  Food on Amtrak depends a lot on the crew, I just had one of my best meals ever on Amtrak on the Capitol Limited a couple of weeks ago out of Chicago. Usually the Empire Builder is always good.   

Thanks.  Wife is calling their information line tomorrow.

 

And now for a couple of tips for the OP:

(1)  Trim your toenails before you go or start the hike.  If they're too long it will be painful as you start the long walk downhill.

(2) It's a dry climate, and altitude of 8,000+ ft. holds even less humidity.  Take twice as much water as you think you'll need.  I bring a 3L water pack (Osprey) and my wife brings a 1L bottle for these kinds of hikes.  Drink often because if you dehydrate it makes it harder for your heart.

3. Bring moleskin or bandages & ointment in case you get blisters on the hike.  I wear Smart Wool hiking socks--do not wear cotton socks.  They cause blisters.

4. Take a lightweight poncho.  Not only good for keeping off rain, but gives some windchill protection too.

 

Kent in SD

In contento ed allegria

Notte e di vogliam passar!

I was watching one of those house hunting shows. The couple was in Whitefish Mt. The wife went on about the beautiful train that comes there and the camera showed it for a bit. 

I remembered this thread and wondered if you might be the couple in the program? Cool anyway.

USMC 1966-69

The boat tours originate at the Many Glaciers Lodge.  There is a small hike between lakes to the second boat on Grinnell Lake.   Two boats, three different lakes farthest lake pictured is Lake Sherburn.   Ultimate goal from the last boat ride is to hike up to Grinnell Glacier.   A look from the Glacier over the three lakes.  Can be an all day event, bring food and water. 

Early morning boats are good.  The afternoon boat can be crowded with considerable wait time.   Another look. 

Glacier is still a hike up and over from above picture. 

2006 images. 

 

eddie g posted:

Got the "A river runs thru it" DVD today and watched it. Cried at the end. I don't like sad movies. Do you know what river that  was  in the movie?

According to IMDB:

Even though the film claims that it is filmed in Missoula, it is actually filmed in and around Livingston, Bozeman and Big Timber, Montana. Many of the fishing scenes were filmed in the Gallatin Canyon on the Gallatin River south of Bozeman.

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