In December 1945, shortly after the end of WWII, the New Haven decided to buy 75 new cabooses. Steel shortages, labor issues and a change of car builder delayed production until the railroad eventually contracted with International Car Company in 1947 to buy 75 NE-6 steel cabooses at a cost of $6,335 for each standard caboose and an additional $350 if equipped with steam heat. The first NE-6 arrived on November 10th, 1947 but by March 1948, due to higher than anticipated production costs, the New Haven agreed to an increased price of $7,775 for five express cabooses and $7,250 for the remaining standard cabooses, the last of which was received in August 1948. The NE-6s had riveted steel sides, rode on Barber-Bettendorf swing-motion trucks, weighed 47,000 pounds and were numbered from C-635 to C-709. They were delivered in caboose red with a black roof and underbody but were repainted into the McGinnis scheme beginning in 1955. They were used in through and local freight service, and work service. Many New Haven NE-6s lasted to the end of the railroad and received Penn Central paint and numbers in the early 1970s.

The pictured New Haven NE-6 caboose models were made by Atlas O in several runs between 2003 and 2015.

MELGAR

MELGAR_NHRR_NE6_CABOOSES_1_CROP

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MELGAR posted:

 by March 1948, due to higher than anticipated production costs, the New Haven agreed to an increased price of $7,775 for five express cabooses and $7,250 for the remaining standard cabooses,

Stupid question: What is an "express caboose"?

I posted some photos earlier of a Budd Car excursion in 1966 to Bristol, Rhode Island.  This event must have been very well photographed because I just came across three more of the same trip.

The first shows the consist approximately one car length further across the bridge than the last photo.

PWB-RDC-BarringtonRiverB&W

The next is very interesting to me personally because it shows a view I had never seen before.  The consist is crossing the street at Campbell Street and Main Street in Warren, Rhode Island.  Either the train was moving slowly or the photographer was driving like a madman because the two points (bridge and grade crossing) are about 1 mile apart.

PWB-RDC-WarrenMainStreetB&W

The final photo shows yet another view of the Budd cars at their last stop at the head of Bristol Harbor.  This photo is quite similar to the nice color slide posted previously.

Still enjoying this thread,

Steven J. Serenska

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Pat Kn posted:
MELGAR posted:

 by March 1948, due to higher than anticipated production costs, the New Haven agreed to an increased price of $7,775 for five express cabooses and $7,250 for the remaining standard cabooses,

Stupid question: What is an "express caboose"?

In the New Haven's terminology, an "express caboose" was one equipped with steam and air signal lines so that it could be operated in a passenger train. In the steam era, passenger cars had steam lines which received steam from the engine to heat the cars. Some passenger trains had a caboose in the consist and thus had to have steam lines. In the New Haven's case, this applied to cabooses operated to Montreal with Canadian passenger cars. Five of the seventy-five NE-6 cabooses were equipped as such.

MELGAR

MELGAR posted:

In the New Haven's terminology, an "express caboose" was one equipped with steam and air signal lines so that it could be operated in a passenger train. In the steam era, passenger cars had steam lines which received steam from the engine to heat the cars. Some passenger trains had a caboose in the consist and thus had to have steam lines. In the New Haven's case, this applied to cabooses operated to Montreal with Canadian passenger cars. Five of the seventy-five NE-6 cabooses were equipped as such.

MELGAR

Thanks

briansilvermustang posted:

          ???

Fairbanks Morse 'John Quincy Adams' locomotive (class P-12-42). Pulled a set of Talgo cars of Spanish design (thinking that they were built on contract by ACF in the US).Boston and Maine tried a set as the 'Speed Merchant.'.

One of several ventures the NH made into lightweight trains in order to try and suppress their growing deficits from passenger service. Joined by the 'Train X' (NH Train name Daniel Webster) from Baldwin, and the Roger Williams (Budd car set with a bulldog nose).  Only one that survived that era were the Budd cars, Amtrak ran them for quite a few years.

The GM Aerotrain was another entry into the lightweight train craze. As with the Talgo cars, they ran rough and literatlly bounced teh passengers out of their seats on rough track. The Rock Islan kept some of the Aerotrains, just to punish their commuters.

 

Jim Waterman

Lee Lines Limited

Custom Built Standard Gauge

 

A reprise of my recent purchase and repaired EP-5 with NH three car consist.

IMG_5368

And as probably stated earlier extending with two PRR ribbed streamliners.  The Pennsy and NH had a tight relationship.  In the January 14,1953 crash of "The Federal" three NH cars followed GG1 motor 4876 into the basement of Washington Union Station.  In fact 9 of the 16 cars consist were NH's.

IMG_5523

And the tail end will be completed with some combinations of these.

IMG_5525

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The first New Haven 8200 series passenger car was delivered in 1934 from Pullman Standard in Worcester, Massachusetts, The New Haven purchased 205 such cars which served before, during and after WWII and for years were pulled by I-5 Hudson locomotives between New Haven and Boston. They were modern streamlined air-conditioned lightweight cars, 84-feet 6-inches in length, weighing 54-1/2 tons compared to 73 tons for the New Haven's 8100 class heavyweight cars. They became known as "American Flyer" cars after the A.C. Gilbert Company of New Haven, Connecticut made American Flyer S gauge models of them in the 1950s. One-hundred-and-thirty-five cars remained on the New Haven roster when Penn Central took over in 1969. The photos show car 8227 on my 12-by-8 layout. The O scale model is 21-inches in length and was manufactured by Weaver Models.

MELGAR

MELGAR_2_AM_FLYER_8227MELGAR_9_AM_FLYER_8227

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Always loved those Osgood Bradley coaches but don't have the room for the Weaver ones. Hence i built 6 of them - 5 in NH markings and 1 in Lehigh Valley markings, including a NH Cafe car. I've posted these pics. before. I started with KLine 13" coaches, removed the window areas, bought a bunch of "junker" American Flyer coaches at train shows,  very carefully removed the AF window sections using a fine toothed band saw, grafted them into the KLine cars, painted them with Scalecoat Hunter Green, and had the decals custom made. The coach shown here with the red markers has a "Merchant's Ltd." lighted drumhead in the rear vestibule.

DSC00006DSC00010

jackson, CEO, Not-So-Great Eastern RR, aka The Never Done Line

          Division of the Southern Adirondack Railway Cartel

 

 

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A New Haven passenger consist on my 12-by-8 O gauge railroad... The New Haven often ran different types of passenger cars within a train. This one has an 8700 postwar series streamlined passenger car #8701, the prewar heavyweight parlor car "Flying Cloud," both by MTH, and American Flyer car #8227 by Weaver. The locomotive is EP-5 #371, an old model from the first run of MTH EP-5s with PS-1. Runs nicely in conventional without speed control and has "Jet" blower sounds and horn.

MELGAR

2017_1103_MELGAR_EP5_CONSIST

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Thanks for this thread.. I just viewed all 7 pages.. May even inspire me to go down to the layout this weekend. haven't felt much like going downstairs for awhile...I could use some rr time!

I may even need to post some pictures of my NH collection..Once I learn how to do that!

  bptbill

MELGAR posted:

The first New Haven 8200 series passenger car was delivered in 1934 from Pullman Standard in Worcester, Massachusetts, The New Haven purchased 205 such cars which served before, during and after WWII and for years were pulled by I-5 Hudson locomotives between New Haven and Boston. They were modern streamlined air-conditioned lightweight cars, 84-feet 6-inches in length, weighing 54-1/2 tons compared to 73 tons for the New Haven's 8100 class heavyweight cars. They became known as "American Flyer" cars after the A.C. Gilbert Company of New Haven, Connecticut made American Flyer S gauge models of them in the 1950s. One-hundred-and-thirty-five cars remained on the New Haven roster when Penn Central took over in 1969. The photos show car 8227 on my 12-by-8 layout. The O scale model is 21-inches in length and was manufactured by Weaver Models.

MELGAR

MELGAR_9_AM_FLYER_8227

Those are nice looking cars.  They run comfortably on O27 curves, right?  

Steven J. Serenska

Serenska posted:
MELGAR_9_AM_FLYER_8227

Those are nice looking cars.  They run comfortably on O27 curves, right?  

Steven J. Serenska

Steve,

Absolutely impossible!!! They are the only true-scale New Haven passenger cars that I own. Atlas O bought the tooling from Weaver and is now offering a new run of these cars and says they will run on O-45. The outer loop on my layout is O72...

MELGAR

briansilvermustang posted:

July 30, 2019 MELGAR removed photo.

                                                   info on this train please....

Picture shows the John Quincy Adams, the New Haven's second lightweight train, delivered in February 1957 by ACF Industries. The train was made up of five three-unit coaches with each unit 34 feet in length. It seated 478 passengers but had no dining services. Fairbanks-Morse diesel-electric locomotives (road numbers 3100 and 3101) were positioned at the front and rear of the train, each producing 1,720 HP. They operated into Grand Central Terminal on the 650-volt DC third-rail and thus were given the New Haven designation EDER-7 (Electric-Diesel-Electric Road). At twelve feet in height, they were more than two feet lower than a New Haven C-Liner diesel locomotive. The train had a top speed of 117 MPH and went into service on the Shore Line in March 1957. It was considered rough-riding and the lack of dining facilities was problematical on the roughly four-hour run between New York and Boston. The train was withdrawn from service in 1958. The picture shows the fifteen coaches and two locomotives. Note also that the locomotive appears to be displaying a white flag - indicating that it is some kind of a special train...

MELGAR

briansilvermustang posted:

Mel, thank you for the info on the John Quincy Adams, the New Haven's lightweight train, Brian

You're welcome, Brian. Writing about New Haven trains keeps me out of trouble...

Yes - cars were articulated.

MELGAR

MELGAR posted:
briansilvermustang posted:

Mel, thank you for the info on the John Quincy Adams, the New Haven's lightweight train, Brian

You're welcome, Brian. Writing about New Haven trains keeps me out of trouble...

MELGAR

An interesting fact: Amtrak runs the newer model of the Talgo train between Seattle and Vancouver today. We ride and they are pretty comfy. Just took 50 years to get them right   Look up Amtrak Cascade to see. And a really funny transition car to the F59 diesel that is NOT 2 foot lower than the FM diesel of 1957

Jim Waterman

Lee Lines Limited

Custom Built Standard Gauge

 

briansilvermustang posted:

July 30, 2019 MELGAR removed 2 photos.

          are these the type of cars on the NH  John Quincy Adams train...

I believe this car was part of the Flying Yankee, a train run jointly by the Boston & Maine and Maine Central Railroads which entered service between Boston, Portland and Bangor, Maine in 1935. The train operated until 1957 and has been in the process of restoration at Lincoln, New Hampshire. New England - yes. New Haven - no...

MELGAR

MELGAR:

Thanks for that.  It's exactly what I needed.

On the subject of the New Haven RR and train room decorations, there are a number of 1940's New Haven posters showing a number of New England locations.  These are widely available, relatively inexpensive, and are quite attractive:

While the poster above is my favorite, the one below will be posted above the exit to my Rhode Island-themed train room after I get it framed:

There are many available and, if you live in or are from New England, there's sure to be one that suits your needs. This link shows all of them on eBay.

Enjoy.

Steven J. Serenska

Serenska posted:
briansilvermustang posted:

Hey Brian:

I somehow missed this when you first posted it.  Can you give us more info about his lovely watercolor?  Who did it?  Are prints available?  Does the artist have a website?

Thanks.

Steven J. Serenska

 

 

                                     http://jamesmannartfarm.com/jmas311.html

briansilvermustang posted:

Kind of a dumb question, but the New Haven is the only road I have noticed that will put a leading zero in front of a three digit engine number. Does that zero signify anything???

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Apples55 posted:
briansilvermustang posted:

July 30, 2019 MELGAR removed photo.

Kind of a dumb question, but the New Haven is the only road I have noticed that will put a leading zero in front of a three digit engine number. Does that zero signify anything???

When the New Haven Railroad began to buy diesels, they prefixed the diesel road numbers with a "zero" to indicate that the locomotive was "0ther" than steam. After all steam engines had been retired, the zeros were removed.

MELGAR 

briansilvermustang posted:

July 30, 2019 MELGAR removed photo.

During the 1950s, New Haven managements allowed their electric locomotives to deteriorate and began to use FL-9 diesels to pull freight trains under wires that had to remain electrified for passenger service into New York City. After declaring bankruptcy in 1961, the trustees realized they needed new electric freight locomotives and, in 1963, they acquired 12 nearly new electric locomotives from the Norfolk & Western’s Virginian Railway at the bargain price of $300,000 total. These 3,300 HP motors, designated EF-4, and numbered #300-310, were known as “bricks” on the New Haven and usually ran in pairs. They utilized 11,000-volt AC power and converted it to DC for the traction motors, like the New Haven’s EP-5 passenger electrics. They ran between Cedar Hill (New Haven) and Bay Ridge (Brooklyn) and lasted until the Penn Central takeover in 1969, when they became PC Class E-33 and were removed from New Haven territory. They became Conrail property in 1976 and ran until 1981.

MELGAR

MELGAR_NHRR_EF4_303

 

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