George, Wow, at this point, and Im saying from the beginning of your thread, your room size, your attention to detail, peg board for tools/supplies, your kind helping wife, your organizational skills, and plan of action, are coming together nicely. It’s fun to follow folks building a Dream layout and capturing their thoughts of execution. We all buy lumber, tools, trains, Track, and it’s fun to see how each model railroader builds their layout. Everyone’s different.....I must say, your bridges, background pictures, ideas, are awesome, and your layouts going to be exciting. Now I will critique the next few pages when I get to the present. Thank you for sharing your talents with us here on a The OGR Forum. 

Well, I tried posting the above message at the end of page 12, whoops, so, from page 11 through this point, it’s just Fantastic. I do not know if you’ve been following Gunrunner Johns new pike, but your layout and his are super. I will be following both of you as each of you have super modeling skills.  All layouts, layout rooms, take on their very individual atmosphere, all different, all fun to visit. You learn from everybody.....Great workmanship, Great Thread. It’s going to be a fun to run layout....Happy Railroading 

leapinlarry posted:

George, Wow, at this point, and Im saying from the beginning of your thread, your room size, your attention to detail, peg board for tools/supplies, your kind helping wife, your organizational skills, and plan of action, are coming together nicely. It’s fun to follow folks building a Dream layout and capturing their thoughts of execution. We all buy lumber, tools, trains, Track, and it’s fun to see how each model railroader builds their layout. Everyone’s different.....I must say, your bridges, background pictures, ideas, are awesome, and your layouts going to be exciting. Now I will critique the next few pages when I get to the present. Thank you for sharing your talents with us here on a The OGR Forum. 

Larry,

You are far too kind.  I'm not particularly talented.  I'm a plodder.  I'm mechanical and methodical.  And slow - oh so slow!  There are a lot of vastly more talented modelers here on OGR.

But thank you for your kind words.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 7/8/2019:

Today I added the vertical supports for the sub-roadbed. They will also hold up the masonite sections that support the foam.
By the way, the drawing is out of date. The track centers along the straight segment are not 4 5/8" apart - they are 4.25".

Table 22a

Here are the vertical supports. The first one is closest to the Stone Arch (just off camera to the left).

DSCN6144

The second photo is of this same vertical support from below.

DSCN6145

In order to give them maximum strength, I used 3" screws to attach the vertical 2"x2" from above and below as well as wood glue.  Finally, I marked them done.

I guess you could say the were glued, screwed, and tattooed.    

DSCN6146

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Dave NYC Hudson PRR K4 posted:

Slow and steady wins the race as they say George. Consistent is good too. What's with the "Mother" written on that one piece of wood? Guessing it doesn't mean what I first thought it did. I thought it meant it was a PITA to make and place.

I guess it's a bad joke when you have to explain it.     "Mother" on the wood was a reference to the phrase "glued, screwed, and tattooed".  

Oh well.  Guess I shouldn't quit my day job.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

G3750 posted:
Dave NYC Hudson PRR K4 posted:

Slow and steady wins the race as they say George. Consistent is good too. What's with the "Mother" written on that one piece of wood? Guessing it doesn't mean what I first thought it did. I thought it meant it was a PITA to make and place.

I guess it's a bad joke when you have to explain it.     "Mother" on the wood was a reference to the phrase "glued, screwed, and tattooed".  

Oh well.  Guess I shouldn't quit my day job.  

George

Lol, too funny George.

Updated 7/11/2019:

Today, I am tackling the horizontal supports for the Pennsy cross-section.  Here's the latest (hopefully correct plan (drawing).  Track centers for parallel tracks in the straight sections are 3.75" apart.  

Table 25

OK, so here's the actual.  In this photo, I am positioning the horizontal support for the masonite that will hold the stryofoam scenery.  The carpenter's square shows a depth of 3" from the top of sub-roadbed, but it will be 3.25" to account for the depth of the foam.

DSCN6149

This photo shows a test-fitting or mock-up of how the 1/8" masonite fascia will mate to the benchwork (bottom) and the cross-member.  Width should be a uniform 18".  I used a piece of cardboard to stand-in for the masonite.

DSCN6150

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Attachments

Photos (3)

Updated 7/18/2019:

Yesterday I acquired the 12 gauge stranded wire (500' spools) of Red and Black for the track power buses.  I also picked up 300 Scotchlok IDC 567 connectors (AKA suitcase connectors).  They will be used to splice the GarGraves pigtails (16 gauge) to the 12 gauge bus.  Here's a test crimp.

DSCN6151

I installed two more vertical supports and the cross-arms to hold the foam scenery. The cross-arms are positioned so that the fascia can be screwed to them when the time comes to install it.

DSCN6152DSCN6153

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Attachments

Photos (3)

Updated 7/20/2019:

Today I installed the plywood flooring supports for the styrofoam track side embankments. The original intent was to use 1/4" masonite, but it seemed too flimsy. I ended up doubling the number of vertical supports & cross-beams for this, thinking that would be enough for the masonite. Ultimately, I decided that wouldn't work and used plywood. If worse comes to worse, I can stand on it. Let's hope that never becomes necessary.

Here's a 3/4s view from over head of the rear-most flooring.
DSCN6154

This is a view from straight on (front to rear).
DSCN6155

In this photo you can see the flooring edge-wise.
DSCN6156

Here's another edge-wise view of the end of the flooring. I took this by reaching the camera through the Stone Arch.
DSCN6157

Finally, here's a shot of the front flooring in place. Note that the cross-arms extend out from the rear wall to the depth of the layout (and fascia).
DSCN6158

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Attachments

Photos (5)

Updated 7/23/2019:

Not much to actually show you, but yesterday I did pull 80’ of red and 80’ of black 12 gauge wire off their spools and cable tied them together. That’s the bus for the River Route.  I also calculated the lengths of the remaining 7 buses and finalized the location of the power distribution panel. It’s directly under the hatch.

This evening I pulled the 50' (red & black wires) of the Steubenville bus.

The organization of components on the 2’ x 6’ power distribution panel is still in flux.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 8/11/2019:

While I haven’t posted much, I have been busy on a number of fronts.

The power distribution panel has been laid out. It’s 2’ x 8’ and will be installed near the access hatch. Electrical parts, wire, and connectors have been acquired. Work on this has been progressing. I sold two BPC’s that I didn’t need and acquired the one TPC that I did need.  I anticipate the arrival of the TPC on Wednesday.

While I don't run DCS and therefore don't need "magic" light bulbs, I have equipped each district with a light bulb to indicate power is flowing through it.  The panel will be mounted vertically under the layout.  It will be too dark to read meters under the layout and these will give me a quick indication of status.  Panel wiring for 3 of the 8 power districts has been completed.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Dave NYC Hudson PRR K4 posted:

Yeah, it has been a bit. Always gets busy in August no matter where you are in life. That's the way it seems to me anyhow.

My August has been a mixed bag.  I've been enjoying some day trips, but it's going to get much busier.  I've accepted an adjunct professor position teaching 2 computer science courses; that starts at the end of the month.  Between that and the hobby shop job, layout building time is going to be severely curtailed.  The leisurely pace is over.  I'm just going to have to do more with the time available.  I have a deadline of May 2020 to get trains running.  NMRA MCR Division 2 is hosting the regional convention at the end of May next year and I want the layout ready for tours.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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