PROBLEMS WITH THE PFA BUTTON

Last night I was running an ES44AC MTH engine, not that it matters but Just in case, and I tried the set speed feature.  Liked it, set the speed to 55 and all of a sudden I went from 27 to 55 SMPH.  Not the PFA button but is that supposed to happen?  I thought it was supposed to gradually increase to 55 not fire off like it had a rocket up it's butt.

Anyway, trying new things, I pushed the PFA button, (Passenger/Freight Announcements).  "Don, looks like we've been ordered to a siding track to let another train go by."  Next thing I knew I had a CSX 8888 issue on my hand.  I had a remote that would not talk to the track, so I had an ES44AC barreling around the track at 55 miles fake miles per hour, and no way to stop it cleanly.  DIR didn't work, E-stop didn't work, shooting at the fuel tank shut off valve didn't work.  I finally had to use the off switch on my brick to stop it.  Why does my PFA button do this to my trains?  It's happened before.  Don is told move to a siding track and suddenly my engine no longer wants to play with me.

Original Post

Once your in PFA mode you have no control until the sequence is finished. I  think there is four parts to the sequence cycle to each one using the DIR button. In the last sequence the engine will ring the bell and move out at the speed it came in on, when the bell stops ringing you have control.  On my pike the PFA button is off limits unless you are competent with its operation. 

As far as taking off to fast , did you set your acceleration speed ?

Hope this helps

Clem

I have had several replies to this and I wish to acknowledge all of them.  First, I was asked my signal strength.  The suggestion was to check it with the remote and TIU.  How do I do this?

Don has been suspended till further notice for joy riding in company equipment.

I tried hitting the PFA button again but not only did it not work, nothing worked.  It was as if the remote had lost connection with the track.

Finally, I know MTH created this.  But what purpose does it serve?  I run freight trains.  I can understand something akin to a pilot coming on the com and saying, "good afternoon ladies and gentleman, this is your pilot speaking.  Like to welcome you aboard crash and burn airlines."  But "Well Don it looks like we've been directed to a siding track to let another train go by."  First of all, you have to be on the track the other train is using, and this sounds like something that would be said while you are moving, not sitting still inside a railyard.  "Dispatch this is Renegade 69."  "Go ahead 69."  "Roger we're bored and would like to leave, how about throwing the Chesapeake switch and letting us the hell out of here."  "No."

Now that's entertaining television

First thing about the set speed function, would be to set the accel rate to the #1 so that the engine does not appear to jump to a high speed setting. Even if you don't change it, knowing that the engine adjusts quickly, I'd recommend using a couple of steps to get up to full track speed. Set the engine at 15 MPH for example and then another setting like 25 MPH.

 The PFA sequence is activated by pressing the PFA button, and then the red direction button after you hear the bell start ringing and when you wish the engine to stop, or play the next sound sequence. It will accelerate at the end to the last speed the engine was at before you pressed the PFA. So again use the accel rate to change just how fast the engine goes up to that speed or slow the engine before pressing the PFA!

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

Again all great replies, thanks again.  In reference to using PFA on a stopped train, I agree 100%.  I did that this evening with my CSX ES44AC.  Nice little diddy about being cleared to take the track headed for wherever.  On that same note, yes, it does appear that the 8888 incident was due to complete loss of signal, as the most important button for just such an occasion did not respond.  As for the accel rate settings, I will play with that, did not think of that.  Thanks for the help on that one.  Did experience something this evening and if this is along the lines of bad signal power, I need to know why and how to address it.  My CSX engine WAS on the track, even though the remote said it wasn't.  I checked all trucks and wheel and they were planted on the rails.  So, did only other thing I could do and moved the engine to the terminal track piece and tried again.  All of a sudden it was on the track and I selected it and I ran it.  So why didn't it register no more than 3 feet away on a parking track?

I've seen ENGINE NOT ON TRACK many times after selecting an engine.  Usually, if I press the START button anyway, the engine starts up.

I can't answer your question as to why it registers only 3 feet away and I don't know why mine start up even though they are "not on the track", but I'm interested to see what answers you get.

Sometimes, when you come across a signal issue like you may be experiencing here, it might be helped somewhat by cleaning the track. Give it a good wipe down, i find that sometimes it helps when one of my PS loco's gets wonky.

From the DCS manual;

Track Signal

DCS allows you to test the power distribution to your track, so you can find and repair weak spots.

1. Go to the active engine list and select the Proto-Sound 2.0 engine you will use to test the track signal.

2. Scroll through the softkey list and select the softkey under More.

3. Scroll down to Track Signal in the complete softkey list.

4. After about a second the LCD will show you the track quality in the form of a number that gets updated once per second. For most operations, a number of 5 or higher is strong enough to run your layout. For especially data intensive operations, such as Proto-Cast and sound set downloads, your may find that a higher number is required.

5. When you are ready to stop checking track signal and return to normal operations, press and hold the S5 softkey under END for 1-2 seconds until the LCD returns to the active engine screen.

After cleaning the track and checking signal level, if it's anything lower than 10s, you might try a few things.

Remove any Lionel (TMCC and/or Legacy) equipped engines and powered cars from the track. In fact, remove all other brands and equipment. Like cabooses and pass cars. Just test one engine for signal, at a time alone on the track. 

If you have anything drawing power from the same source as the track, remove it.

If you have a car with lights push it around the track and watch to see if it dims as it goes round.

Try connecting the outside rails together.

Make sure all track joints are solid. If any problem areas you may have to solder them together.

What brand and model of track? What power supply? how big is the layout? How many power connections?

What model TIU? any lights connected for signal?

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

After cleaning the track and checking signal level, if it's anything lower than 10s, you might try a few things.  My responses are in this color using your questions

 Remove any Lionel (TMCC and/or Legacy) equipped engines and powered cars from the track. In fact, remove all other brands and equipment. Like cabooses and pass cars. Just test one engine for signal, at a time alone on the track.  Keep reading

 If you have anything drawing power from the same source as the track, remove it.

All of my outlets I have in the room are wired to the same breaker. Only the outlets at the cabinet shelf where I keep my equipment are powering the powered equipment, i.e. the TIU, the Brick, the Base 1L box, and a Transformer I hooked to the variable IN 1 port for my grandson’s train.

 If you have a car with lights push it around the track and watch to see if it dims as it goes round.

I have lighted caboose cars for four of my five trains. The test I ran earlier this week showed a dead spot, I guess, in one switch track, but mostly I see flickering due to the natural bumpy ride all cars get on a model train track.

 Try connecting the outside rails together.

Not an electrical engineer, not familiar with this. How?

 Make sure all track joints are solid. If any problem areas you may have to solder them together.

I did the best I can do with what I have to work with in a less than square room. Due to curve needs for one engine, and the fact all but one of them have to have 060 or higher curve, I can’t cut the corners as sharp as I would have liked. Off shoot parking tracks that use switch track led to 17 switch track pieces that are working but several lamps are dead. In the process of trying to make my curves and straights meet in the middle and the fact that you are working with non-customizable lengths, no cutting and re-pinning, what I finally got, is what I have to live with. I did the math, I bought the pieces, I have them as tight as they can get without precisely cutting a piece or two to eliminate the odd stretch and bend at certain points.

 What brand and model of track?

Brand is Lionel, Model is Fastrack.

 What power supply?

This could be some of the issue due to my lack of electrical knowledge. No one I’ve told this has come back with any “Oh god, not that.” Responses. I use a 180 watt Brick creatively engineered at the plug in point that is wired directly to the Fixed IN 1 port of a DCS TIU. I have Z1000 MTH transformer wired to the Variable IN 1 port that is hooked via the TIU to a set of wires leading to an elevated shelf I plan to put my grandson’s old conventional on, and run it with the remote and not the transformer dial. Transformer dial is currently in the full off, no power, setting. (all the way to the left).

 

how big is the layout?

3 “squoval” tracks. 3 tracks hooked together by switch track allowing the engine to snake its way off the outer squoval, to or through track 2 and then to track 3 which leads at the very top straight and very bottom straight to off shoot parking tracks so I can get the trains off the main lines so I can run other trains and not just the one I can’t find a home for. The outer most track has a straight away on each side of about 15 feet then it 084’s to a top and bottom straight of about the same length. As the layout snakes inward you can reduce the length maybe 4 inches. By the time you reach a parking track you go from the north end to the south end maybe 14 feet. Squoval means square oval.

 How many power connections?

Right now. One. I have a piece of straight in the middle of the top straight of the outer most track nearest my cabinet with a wire running through a hole into what will be under the bottom shelf to hide the wires, hooked to a terminal block screw set 1 (of 12, not 24). The block is wired to the Fixed OUT 1 port via the terminal blocks two big red and black, you can’t miss us unless you’re stupid connection points. 16 gauge wire. I also have a Base 1L box grounded to the black wire leading into the TIU from the terminal block. The brick, the TIU, the transformer and the Base 1 are all plugged in to one of two outlets that run along the wall above the second shelf of a cabinet in which I call my operations center.

 What model TIU? Version 6.0 software. MTH Item number 50-1001

 

any lights connected for signal? Saw that in the DCS manual but again, not electrically savvy and not sure just what the heck that accomplishes since I am not familiar with all the harum scarum crazy cooky things electricity does to itself when it is powering a device. “noise”, continuity, I do know the bigger the wires the better the flow, but in this case, 16 is about all you can really graduate too due to small surface areas to work within. 14-2 with ground is small in the house building world but crane cable in the O gauge world.

Reseating the boards in the TIU and Remote are scary thoughts for me right now.  In the model train world I am barely sitting up and eating solid food right now.  As you can see from all the replies and questions, I could be categorized as still bottle feeding.  Good suggestion, will keep that tucked away in my pacifier pocket.  For now let's see if I even have the track hooked up correctly.   

clem k posted:

Once your in PFA mode you have no control until the sequence is finished. I  think there is four parts to the sequence cycle to each one using the DIR button. In the last sequence the engine will ring the bell and move out at the speed it came in on, when the bell stops ringing you have control.  On my pike the PFA button is off limits unless you are competent with its operation. 

As far as taking off to fast , did you set your acceleration speed ?

Hope this helps

Clem

As Clem K always told me "NEVER PUSH THE PFA BUTTON!"

But did I listen? Nope... I think it was the biggest train wreck Clem ever had ever seen on his layout!

Sorry there Clem!

Why MTH design a button that locks you out any commands for 2 minutes is beyond me...

 

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TCA Number 16-71884

Yardmaster96 posted:

 

 If you have anything drawing power from the same source as the track, remove it.

All of my outlets I have in the room are wired to the same breaker. Only the outlets at the cabinet shelf where I keep my equipment are powering the powered equipment, i.e. the TIU, the Brick, the Base 1L box, and a Transformer I hooked to the variable IN 1 port for my grandson’s train.

 

To be more clear...

If your brick that is connected to your track, also powers your switch motors or any other powered accessories, disconnect those and see if the signal gets better.

 If you have TMCC/Legacy connected to the layout, try also removing it and see if the signal strength gets better.

I think, that most layouts loose the signal by having to run with the power thru switches and poor track joints. We blame the signal by default, when actually it's power supply issues right at the track.

PS. I have no issues playing the PFA anywhere on my layout. You must have signal reaching the engines and returning to the remote for proper DCS operation. It is a 2 way communication. Other systems just send out packets and don't need any confirmation that they are ever received.

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

 "How many power connections?

Right now. One. I have a piece of straight in the middle of the top straight of the outer most track nearest my cabinet with a wire running through a hole into what will be under the bottom shelf to hide the wires, hooked to a terminal block screw set 1 (of 12, not 24). The block is wired to the Fixed OUT 1 port via the terminal blocks two big red and black, you can’t miss us unless you’re stupid connection points. 16 gauge wire. I also have a Base 1L box grounded to the black wire leading into the TIU from the terminal block. The brick, the TIU, the transformer and the Base 1 are all plugged in to one of two outlets that run along the wall above the second shelf of a cabinet in which I call my operations center."

It sounds like you have the TIU Out going to a 12 port terminal block but then only one connection to the track and all the loops are electrically connected. Not a DCS guru by any means, but if that's the case, having only one power drop doesn't seem like enough for the size of your layout. You might try power connections to the track about every 8-10 feet of track or 10-12 track sections. In addition, DCS likes the track divided into blocks so the signals don't "overload" the system, so you might try that as well. I would place each power drop in the middle of a track block and the track blocks can be created by either disconnecting the wire underneath the short (1 3/8") sections of FT at each end of a block or, if no short sections are close enough, by cutting the center rail (with a Dremel or by hand) at each end of a block.

Just my  $0.02

 

Yardmaster96 posted:

Reseating the boards in the TIU and Remote are scary thoughts for me right now.  In the model train world I am barely sitting up and eating solid food right now.  As you can see from all the replies and questions, I could be categorized as still bottle feeding.  Good suggestion, will keep that tucked away in my pacifier pocket.  For now let's see if I even have the track hooked up correctly.   

If the remote isn't shutting off from the batteries loosing contact or powering down due to inactivity and the E-STOP doesn't work, I would almost be sure the problem is with the remote or TIU transceivers in them. If this is the problem, you are just chasing your tail in doing anything else IMHO. 

This would be the first thing I would check or have someone else check.

The remotes get dropped and loosen the transceiver boards all the time. Many folks put extra foam between the transceivers and cases to help this from happening again.  It also can happen with the TIU.

Same as Engineer Joe, I have never had an issue with the PSA. Works great for me. 

Yardmaster96 posted:

….  So why didn't it register no more than 3 feet away on a parking track?

this is why I was centering my comments towards track signal. Seems like there's a lot going on without fully understanding what he's doing. There are sidings that are powered exactly how? We aren't sure yet. I could keep throwing guesses trying to get any scraps of info.

Maybe they are drawing power from the mainline? Maybe they have TMCC equipment parked on them?

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

Joe Allen posted:
Yardmaster96 posted:

Reseating the boards in the TIU and Remote are scary thoughts for me right now.  In the model train world I am barely sitting up and eating solid food right now.  As you can see from all the replies and questions, I could be categorized as still bottle feeding.  Good suggestion, will keep that tucked away in my pacifier pocket.  For now let's see if I even have the track hooked up correctly.   

If the remote isn't shutting off from the batteries loosing contact or powering down due to inactivity and the E-STOP doesn't work, I would almost be sure the problem is with the remote or TIU transceivers in them. If this is the problem, you are just chasing your tail in doing anything else IMHO. 

This would be the first thing I would check or have someone else check.

The remotes get dropped and loosen the transceiver boards all the time. Many folks put extra foam between the transceivers and cases to help this from happening again.  It also can happen with the TIU.

Same as Engineer Joe, I have never had an issue with the PSA. Works great for me. 

I have to agree that starting with the very basics would be best here. We'll go from there. Get the system to work period.

A 4 wire handset cord tethering the remote directly to the TIU would prove if any of the boards inside the units are loose.

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

One question was about what is powering my switches.  The track.  By virtue of the track being its own conductor of electricity, the track is powering itself.  I hooked this up like my old 1971 DT&I Yardmaster.  One CTC lock on, two ultra thin wires, one transformer, 10 track pieces sending electricity through the rails in a circle.  I understand perfectly, the longer the stretch of track, straights, curves, and now switch track, the weaker the power gets the further away from the home connection you get.  On this layout, I took a brick.  Not sure what its given name is, but a 180 watt brick, plugged it into the wall.  I took some wire cutters.  Cut the funky looking end off the wire that Lionel thought would be going to its legacy system, which it was designed to plug into.  Split the wires down the middle making two wires, one with writing on it, the other without.  The one with writing on it, as I was told, is the "red" wire.  Process of elimination, the other wire in this picture is the "black" wire.  I exposed the copper wire under the rubber cover, attached each wire to its own banana connector, then plugged said wire into the back of the TIU into the Fixed IN 1 port.

Now I have power going from the wall to the TIU through a brick that I can turn on or off respectively.  To hook up the track, I simply took some 16 gauge wire, snaked it under and through my cabinet to the Fixed OUT 1 port.  Red to Red, Black to Black.  At the opposite end of this I took the same two 16 gauge wires and hooked them to a terminal block board I just bought from MTH.  I hooked those wire to the BIG black and red connection points on the board.  I took two more wires, 16 gauge, and connected those respectively to the red and black screws on port 1 then ran the other end of those wires out to one piece of 10 inch straight track the way everyone else does it.

  Now I have power coming from the breaker box, to the receptacle, through the brick's power cord into the brick.  From there it leaves the brick, I assume at the same strength it was when it got there, and through the 16 gauge wire I used to hook the brick to the TIU, the power goes into the TIU, still cooking with gas, and leaves the TIU, again through 16 gauge wire, still cooking at the same flame level as it was when it left the breaker box, and finally, it reaches the 10 inch piece of track, and fans out left and right throughout the connected pieces of track that run from both the right end and the left end of the terminal piece, as it is called.  I understand that as it travels to the right and left it gets weaker and weaker as more track comes into play.

My switch tracks are not powered by anything other than the track in front of them, and the track behind them in the sequence.  Connect all the pieces on track one, you have a complete sequence.  Branch off of a switch onto track two, starts a new track, but is part of the same sequence.  Complete that oval, branch off another switch, new oval but same sequence.  Once that oval is fully connected, now you use more switch track to branch off that oval to individual straightaways I use for off track parking.  5 straightaways, but still part of the same sequence of electricity that started back on track one at the 10 inch piece I have spoken so fondly of.

I'm sorry to sound frustrated or seem as if I am getting ****ed off about this, I'm not, but this is the best I can do to explain how my track is wired.  I am letting the natural design of the track pieces power themselves.  Think Christmas lights.  One strand, 50 bulbs, plug the strand into a wall outlet and you get 50 lit lights.  Each light is powered by virtue of being part of that strand.  That's how all of my ovals are powered.  One 10 inch track piece, we will call him Atlas, is powering my entire layout.  Now that we have that out of the way.

I plan to run more wire to various parts of the layout using that terminal block I just bought.  I figure if I can't boost the power output using 11 off shoot wire connections all hooked to the same terminal block, then screw it,  I'll just live with whatever poltergeists I am forced to live with.  As for the Lionel portion of this DCS odyssey, you have to have a Base1L box if you don't want to spend the dough it takes to have two systems hooked to one track and two remotes, that's.....not the most efficient way to do things in my book.  One system, one remote, live with the quirks, have fun, forget the advanced stuff, learn what you can when you can find time to learn it, but make sure your track is working before you get involved with the ins and outs of the propulsion system.  I had one good switch just today go south on me.  Light works, switch quit.  For some **** reason a car derailed, sparks flew, and now I have a working lamp light but no remote switch.  I also discovered that curve arc isn't a guideline it's a rule.  Engine made it just fine but the arc was too steep for the coupler bend.  The coupler flew way out but the reefer it was hooked too couldn't swing that far and off she went.

Had one person tell me if I learned anything new about "engine not on track" let him know.  You were right, dial up the whiz wheel, sucker starts fine, off you go.

My track signal runs from 10 at the terminal piece, down to 3 on the far back straight stretch on the outer track.  Hopefully my jumper wires strategically placed about the ovals will help that.

As for plugging stuff in, I have what I have and that's all I have.  11 outlets all wired in a daisy chain hooked to a 20 amp breaker, and the only thing plugged in besides The Brick, the transformer for my grandson's track and the Base 1, is a wall clock at the entry door.

I can't thank all of you enough for what you are doing.  I appreciate all of your advice and helpful hints.  I wish I could show you what I have laid out and maybe if I can get back far enough I can send you a picture.  If not for wiring help, to show it off, I am proud of what I have gotten done so far. 

John

One question was about what is powering my switches.  The track.

That's a big "no-no". That runs the DCS signal through the switch motors and can seriously degrade the DCS signal.


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Barry

 

DCS Ambassador & author of The DCS Companion series of books

Train-Ca-Teers - All For O and O For All!

 

Adding more power drops is a good thing.

As Barry said, there have been issues with interference with the DCS signal and a number of threads on the Forum about the cause and cure. Obviously, you could change to auxillary power for your switches, but pulling the jumper blade underneath the FT switch and replacing it with a 22 uh choke can also be effective. I don't know for sure if that is causing a DCS signal loss, but it's worth exploring and, other than having to remove each switch from the layout, the choke fix is not difficult.

https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...-reliability-upgrade

 

Ok, now we are getting some place.  My question to Barry and Richie and anyone else out there who wants to field this question.  Switch track and AIU attachment.  Unless you can convince me otherwise, those holes are too tiny for anything above 26 gauge.  A customer service guy at Model Train Stuff told me to use telephone wire.  I agree.  The screws on the switch and the AIU are "eyeglasses" ear piece small.  So the holes can't be any bigger.

If I hook the switches to the AIU, for hand held remote capability of course, I can't keep running around the room flipping switches, won't that degrade signal as well?  Powering them via the natural connection of the track is degrading or can degrade the signal.  If I go ahead and connect them to the AIU, will that become an alternative powering source.  My confusion is that the switch track by nature of the beast have to be connected to the track you are running the trains so by nature if the track is connected to the TIU so you can use the DCS system to run the trains, whether you connect to the auxiliary side and find a way to power the pieces alternatively, or leave it as is, you still run the signal through the switch motor by virtue of having the track piece connected to other track pieces on your layout.

I hope that makes sense.  I wrote it and still can't quite figure out what I said

The MTH AIU is really just a bunch of relays. It does not supply power to the items. It passes it. 

You could get another power source like a small wall wart of the correct size and power, to use just for powering the switch machines.

 This post and another current one is using the term "switches" for both the switch itself (to carry track power) and the switch machines that move the points.

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

Good point.  I think the other term people like to use for the track piece is "turnout".  Although when I write switch, I am always talking about the track piece, not the motor.  So you can buy a board that plugs into and outlet that can be used as a powering device for turnout track?

Unless you can convince me otherwise, those holes are too tiny for anything above 26 gauge.

I use 18 gauge stranded wire in all 10 of my AIUs. It fits just fine.

I can't keep running around the room flipping switches, won't that degrade signal as well? 

No, why would it?

My confusion is that the switch track by nature of the beast have to be connected to the track you are running the trains so by nature if the track is connected to the TIU so you can use the DCS system to run the trains, whether you connect to the auxiliary side and find a way to power the pieces alternatively, or leave it as is, you still run the signal through the switch motor by virtue of having the track piece connected to other track pieces on your layout.

I hope that makes sense.

No, that does not make sense.

The circuit for the motor and the tracks are completely separate (except for sharing the Common wire, perhaps) unless you make them the same. The DCS signal is carried on the Hot wire.

Barry

 

DCS Ambassador & author of The DCS Companion series of books

Train-Ca-Teers - All For O and O For All!

 

Barry.  Just so we are on the same page about the "running around the room" I meant won't hooking the track to the AIU degrade the signal, not me running around the room.  I have since learned from another member that the AIU is a relay not a power source.  Now, as for the 18 gauge wire advice, thank you.  To the naked untrained eye those holes look to small to fit a strand of hair.  But since you use 18 gauge with no fit issues, I guess my next question is, since it's a relay and, according to the guy at Model Train Stuff, turnouts do not need a ton of power to work, will using the 26 gauge telephone wire degrade or reduce any usage factors.  Bad example, if a water bucket will work for what you need to do that's fine, but if you can use a water tank, then I'd recommend going with the tank.

Now, since it's no secret that I have no idea how stuff works, and it's obvious that I need professional help, does your book cover how to use DCS effectively, or does it delve into the needs of the track so DCS can work effectively.  Long question short, can I buy your latest version of your DCS book and learn how to wire turnouts so I won't degrade my DCS signal.  Obviously we have determined how I have them hooked up now isn't going to help so the next step is, "this is how you power them so you won't degrade the signal through the motor."

I learned most of what I know about the DCS system, from Barry. We disagree on a very few points. I appreciate his constant, unwavering help and expertise. I still go back to "the book" (his) whenever issues arise.

 So get the book!

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

Just so we are on the same page about the "running around the room" I meant won't hooking the track to the AIU degrade the signal, not me running around the room. 

First, you don't "hook the track" to an AIU port. You connect the switch motor to an AIU port.

will using the 26 gauge telephone wire degrade or reduce any usage factors

Maybe, maybe not. You're running a motor and it's a motor that doesn't cut off when the switch throws. The motor, unlike the DZxxxx motors that are used with Gargraves and Ross turnouts, stays active as long until the button or AIU circuit is released.

does your book cover how to use DCS effectively, or does it delve into the needs of the track so DCS can work effectively.  Long question short, can I buy your latest version of your DCS book and learn how to wire turnouts so I won't degrade my DCS signal.

Yes to all of the parts of the question.

Barry

 

DCS Ambassador & author of The DCS Companion series of books

Train-Ca-Teers - All For O and O For All!

 

Barry

That does make more sense.  I look at everything as a track connection.  Thanks for the clarification.  As for the motor still running while the AIU circuit is released.  Please don't think me an idiot, but when I remotely flip the lever on the factory remotes, I hear the slide move, but as for the motor that spins the rod with the cog that turns the mechanism moving the slide from one side to the other, I never hear that.  So my question is, when you turnout or go back to straight, is the motor running quietly inside the track, or only running while the turnout portion is engaged?  Trust me i'm just trying to learn how this works, i'm not being dumb on purpose.

I bought your book, from Amazon.  Should be here Monday.

when you turnout or go back to straight, is the motor running quietly inside the track

It's actually running next to the track itself, not inside it.

or only running while the turnout portion is engaged? 

The motor on an Atlas turnout runs as long as its circuit is closed, regardless of whether the circuit is closed by a finger or an AIU relay.

Barry

 

DCS Ambassador & author of The DCS Companion series of books

Train-Ca-Teers - All For O and O For All!

 

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Alan Mancus
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