PRR Panhandle 2.0

Updated 6/1/2018:

We're still at Step 6 (the tricky part). Here is the first upright for the divider. It's clamped in place.

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Here's a slightly closer look at the first upright.  The most important thing for these uprights is that they are vertically straight, relative to the backdrop than anything else.  Within the plane of the backdrop they can be crooked, I don't care.

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Here's the 2nd upright.

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I used a long screw and a corner reinforcement to make sure the second upright stayed in place.

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I also remembered that I have to bolt the two tables together and create holes for wiring runs.

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Q: How do you know you’re making progress converting a pile of lumber into a layout?

A: You start hitting your head on the bench work above.  

 

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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G3750 posted:

Updated 6/1/2018:

 

Benchwork_047_

Q: How do you know you’re making progress converting a pile of lumber into a layout?

A: You start hitting your head on the bench work above.  

 

More when I know it.  

George

George,

  Maybe we should all pitch in and by you a hard hat!  

  Nice progress.

Tom 

MNCW posted:
G3750 posted:

Updated 6/1/2018:

 

Benchwork_047_

Q: How do you know you’re making progress converting a pile of lumber into a layout?

A: You start hitting your head on the bench work above.  

 

More when I know it.  

George

George,

  Maybe we should all pitch in and by you a hard hat!  

  Nice progress.

Tom 

Thanks Tom!  I am pleased with the progress over this week.  We're starting to pick up some momentum.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 6/02/2018:

The progress on the backdrop divider continues!  The next few photos show the installation of 5 of the 6 vertical supports.  That's a piece of masonite backdrop support in the left foreground.

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To get the 3 pieces of masonite to fit, I had to be very careful with the placement of the vertical supports.  Masonite widths (from wall to aisle) are 4', 2', and 4' for a total length of 10'.  The vertical 2x2's must support the points where the masonite pieces abut.

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In this tight space, corner braces were the right choice.

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Here we've got 5 vertical supports in place.

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Here's a photo from behind the backdrop.  I'm wedged in the far corner.

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The framework for the next table is propped up on the blue bins awaiting assembly.

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We even had an inspection visit from Samantha.  Her boss, Chief Motor Inspector Pumpkin is too arthritic to get down the stairs.  So she sent her underling instead.

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George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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I'm counting on Samantha to keep me from taking shortcuts!    

Of course, I do have to keep her from eating sawdust.    If she does, we'll see it later, unfortunately.  

Yeah, I'm trying real hard to not take short-cuts.  There is a plan and there is no rush to get trains running (way too far off in the future).  So far, I feel like I've been careful.  I've stopped and re-thought a number of activities, preventing mistakes.  I feel pretty good about the construction to this point.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Oh yes, eating sawdust.  I can believe that!  Could be a problem on cleanup.

I believe this is one of the most well thought out layout builds I have seen!  The plan is quite impressive; yet to do what you want to do with the steel facility, you need to have a good plan.  Yes rushing it now could squander all the good planning you have done!  I'm glad you are keeping us up to date!

Mark Boyce posted:

Oh yes, eating sawdust.  I can believe that!  Could be a problem on cleanup.

I believe this is one of the most well thought out layout builds I have seen!  The plan is quite impressive; yet to do what you want to do with the steel facility, you need to have a good plan.  Yes rushing it now could squander all the good planning you have done!  I'm glad you are keeping us up to date!

Thank you, Mark.  That is very kind.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 6/03/2018:

After church I managed to assemble most of the 2' x 8' table nearest the aisle (surface #4 on the diagram). I still have a cross member to add and a vertical upright for the divider. After that, I will install the divider and most of the Staging Area will get its plywood subroadbed.

Here are some photos. This first one shows the table on its back with the legs being attached.

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I clamped the new table to the others in the Staging Area. This table's legs differ in several ways from the others.

  • They are outside legs and will be more visible than the others.
  • Because they are more visible, I used poplar so as to improve their looks. I also stained them a slightly darker color than the others (not sure it shows up).
  • Because of imperfections in the floor, these legs are 1/4" shorter than the others. I am also using a slightly wider leveling glide.

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Here's a closer view of the table. A cross member will be installed to support the final vertical backdrop column. The vertical 2x2 will go at the extreme right hand side of the table.

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OK, more when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Updated 6/5/2018:

Yesterday I did play around with my Lionel Industrial Smokestacks for my Open Hearth.  I've cannibalized 2 stacks (taken the middle section) and extended 2 others with them.

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That left me with 2 "shorty" smokestacks (I have only shown the one;  the other needs some repairs).  Anyway, I wired up 3 of them.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Updated 6/12/2018:

Well, the doctor gave my retina a clean bill of health - no tears!!!!      So construction has resumed!

First, I am about 75% through the task of identifying and counting the remaining number and types (measurements) of 2 x 2's that I will need to complete the benchwork. When I've double checked this number, I will place the order and have them delivered. These will need to be shellaced.

Today's work was about attaching the remaining table to the wall and to its neighbors.

I can't recall where I read about this technique.  I want to drill clean holes through the 2 ribs that form adjacent tables. If you clamp another board to them and then drill, you get a clean hole. 

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Here's the clean hole!

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I am using a 4" carriage bolt, 2 fender washers, a lock washer, and a nut to hold tables together.

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Here are the two tables bolted together.

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I am also taking care to drill holes in the ribs to accept wiring.  That will be harder to do with the table tops installed.

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Finally, I attached the table to the end wall with 3" drywall screws.

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Hopefully, more tomorrow!  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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George, That is great news about the retina!!  

My dad taught me that trick to use scrap lumber to get a clean hole.  The only power tool he had when I was growing up was an old power drill.  I like your method of bolting the sections together.  That would work great for a home modular layout that the only intent is to take the modules apart if you had to move or a very rare change of modules.  I'm glad you are back at work on the benchwork again! 

Mark Boyce posted:

George, That is great news about the retina!!  

My dad taught me that trick to use scrap lumber to get a clean hole.  The only power tool he had when I was growing up was an old power drill.  I like your method of bolting the sections together.  That would work great for a home modular layout that the only intent is to take the modules apart if you had to move or a very rare change of modules.  I'm glad you are back at work on the benchwork again! 

Yeah, I am very happy and relieved about the retina settling down.

It's no surprise that the clean hole technique is old, probably well over a hundred years old I would guess.

I've learned that there really is no practical way to build a permanent layout in pieces that can be separated or transported.  You either have to go totally modular, i.e. designed that way or not.  This particular method using carriage bolts is what I used for Panhandle 1.0.  I really didn't give much thought to another approach.  It works.

The innovation (if we can call something that simple by that term) is to drill wiring holes between tables before installing the plywood table top.  I'm expecting that to aid greatly in running wires and keeping the under table clutter to a minimum.

I am trying to be very deliberate in my planning and construction techniques with this layout.  Panhandle 1.0 was built in short 30 and 60 minute slices stolen from the relentless demands of work, family life, and kids.  It was the product of hasty decisions, impatience, and improvisation - often with undesirable outcomes.  Conditions are different now, and I expect the outcome to be much, much better.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Like they always say, "you are never told old to learn." One thing if for sure, no matter how you plan, sometimes there is always something that stops you dead for a bit until you work out the kinks. Its always something. Good to hear things are going smooth with your planning, and glad the retina is better.

Dave, I have been to George's house, and I don't think the original Panhandle Engineers planned it out as much as George has.  What he has on computer and in print is outstanding!  My guess is, there will be small tweeks on Panhandle 2, where you and I may have scrapped whole sections to redo.  

Mark Boyce posted:

Dave, I have been to George's house, and I don't think the original Panhandle Engineers planned it out as much as George has.  What he has on computer and in print is outstanding!  My guess is, there will be small tweeks on Panhandle 2, where you and I may have scrapped whole sections to redo.  

You are too kind.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 6/14/2018:

  • Added another 4 holes for wires to the benchwork.
  • Completed the list of 2x2's
  • Attached the benchwork to the walls.
  • Re-evaluated the benchwork drawing against the layout.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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