PRR Panhandle 2.0

I like the bridge/water changes, it will look really nice I think. I agree that some of the 'peel-n-stick' stuff is a bit lacking in the 'stick' department.

Anymore, any doctor or dentist visit where no repairs are required is a really good one!      Keep up the good visits!!!

rtr12 posted:

I like the bridge/water changes, it will look really nice I think. I agree that some of the 'peel-n-stick' stuff is a bit lacking in the 'stick' department.

Anymore, any doctor or dentist visit where no repairs are required is a really good one!      Keep up the good visits!!!

Thanks!  The changes reflect the prototype.  I want to replicate this as accurately as possible.

3550_11157473405799_1234195720PhotoShoot_038_PhotoShoot_028_

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Updated 9/3/2018:

The man with the soldering skills (my younger son) was in town with his family over this Labor Day Weekend. So I made him labor!   

He fixed some broken wires on one of the Lionel Industrial Smokestacks that I had cannibalized to make two tall stacks. I now have 2 tall stacks and 2 short stacks. All have lights that flicker and all smoke (somewhat anemically in the typical Lionel manner). I suppose that if they produced smoke prototypically, all attendees to the layout would have lung cancer and not be able to see 3' in front of themselves.   

Smokestacks_001_Smokestacks_002_Smokestacks_003_Smokestacks_004_

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Updated 9/5/2018:

Quite awhile ago, I had decided on dimmable 4100K LED light bulbs for both the workshop and the trainroom. I placed the order for them about 10 days ago. I hadn't heard from the supplier so I called them. Turns out they had misfiled the order under some horrid (not the usual) butchering of my name. Eventually, they found the order. Turns out it was short as well. I'm expecting to pick up the full order next week.

The battle with the peel & stick stone facing continues. Today I managed to get one of the faces of the arch covered. Copious amounts of E-6000 were required. Here are two photos - the first showing the weighted facing and the second showing the finished facing.

Benchwork_203_

Benchwork_204_

I also examined the LEDs that will be used for the pier navigation lights. The leads are long enough to get through the piers.  I will extend them once they are sticking out the bottom.  The photo shows (top) one of the lights in its test fitting.  At the bottom is the Evans Design LED I am using.

Benchwork_206_

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Mark Boyce posted:

I would say the stone arch is worth the trouble getting it to stick.  The pier will look great with those lights.

Mark,

I think it will as well.  Regardless of how easy or hard it is to get them to stick, we're committed to finishing it.

Yes, the lights do enhance the pier.  And they are prototypical.

DSCN0155DSCN0157DSCN0158

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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G3750 posted:
rtr12 posted:

I like the bridge/water changes, it will look really nice I think. I agree that some of the 'peel-n-stick' stuff is a bit lacking in the 'stick' department.

Anymore, any doctor or dentist visit where no repairs are required is a really good one!      Keep up the good visits!!!

Thanks!  The changes reflect the prototype.  I want to replicate this as accurately as possible.

3550_11157473405799_1234195720PhotoShoot_038_PhotoShoot_028_

George

You know what?  Screw this realism, I've decided to go for this...

Joke

LOL.               

OK, maybe not.  

Seriously, I am working on bridge pedestals at the moment.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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That could make an interesting scene! It does make it look neat with the water mist and maybe even some crashing water sounds. Kind of adds some excitement even or the feel of it maybe?  

But, OTOH, I kind of liked it the old way, I think...I'm old and the calm, gently flowing waters are more soothing to the old tired eyes, body and brain. I could picture myself out below the bridge, down by the water (nice and quiet) just sitting (or maybe laying down) and just relaxing on a nice sunny day. Maybe even throw a line in the water (no bait on the hook, of course...that would prevent fish, which would in turn make me have to get up, ruining my nice afternoon of relaxation ).

Actually, I think which ever way you choose it will look great, it's a really good looking bridge and scene to go along with it. Going to be really nice either way.

rtr12 posted:

That could make an interesting scene! It does make it look neat with the water mist and maybe even some crashing water sounds. Kind of adds some excitement even or the feel of it maybe?

Uh, I'm not really doing that.  That was a joke.  

But, OTOH, I kind of liked it the old way, I think...I'm old and the calm, gently flowing waters are more soothing to the old tired eyes, body and brain. I could picture myself out below the bridge, down by the water (nice and quiet) just sitting (or maybe laying down) and just relaxing on a nice sunny day. Maybe even throw a line in the water (no bait on the hook, of course...that would prevent fish, which would in turn make me have to get up, ruining my nice afternoon of relaxation ).

Actually, I think which ever way you choose it will look great, it's a really good looking bridge and scene to go along with it. Going to be really nice either way.

I really enjoyed my boat trip with the photographer to get the shots for the backdrop.  The Ohio does flow pretty gently and that day it was absolutely smooth as glass.  It was warm, and it was all I could do to not jump into the water.  It was that inviting!  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

I thought you might be kidding there, but it could have also made a nice, interesting scene. However, I didn't think that was what you were aiming for. (And your layout would be really nice either way too.)

I bet that boat trip was really nice and enjoyable. Sounds quite appealing to me as well! Probably fascinating going along and looking at the underside of the bridge too. I enjoy studying old structures like that and imagining the people working on it and what they had to go through back then to construct it (spent my life in construction). I also think it's pretty cool that you took the time and put forth the effort to take the trip to get the pictures. I would call that going the extra mile (and enjoying it!). 

I think I am finally at the point in my life where stopping to smell the flowers (so to speak) or looking at the structures is becoming much more important than getting somewhere in a hurry or meeting a deadline or whatever else used to seem so important during ones working life. I am sensing that you are possibly about at that point too. Retirement is just wonderful, time to really enjoy life as we should. Looks like you might be doing that too!

Updated 9/15/2018:

It's been a rough week. About 9 days ago, my Outlook email client program began acting up - creating duplicate messages and not permitting deletions.     I have been working with a data recovery product to rebuild the file used by Outlook to store emails, contacts, and calendar settings (outlook.pst).  That file is approaching the size limit handled by my old version of Outlook.  Unfortunately, a ton of information is stored within that I don't want to lose.  Saving the file is a long process that has involved several rebuilds.  It is still on-going.  I've been using the web e-mail interface in the meantime.

Despite being preoccupied by this event, I have managed to make a few color samples for the piers.  Once again, the value of photographs of the prototype is being demonstrated.  These photos prevent me from speculating as to the correct colors of the piers or relying on my not-so-perfect memory.  When in doubt, refer to the prototype!  I plan to experiment with a few more color samples.  My first target is the "shorty" pier on the WV side. It was re-used from the previous (2nd) bridge and is probably close to 130 years old.  It is darker in color than the newer piers.  I'm thinking about applying a dark gray wash to it.

The "pocket" and mid-stream piers date from the mid-1920s.  They're newer, only about 90-93 years old.    I am thinking about creating and applying some washes that are lighter in color - white, vanilla, or flesh - with some rust.  All piers will get a dark gray (concrete) coat on their upper ring.

Finally, my order of dimmable 4100K LED bulbs came in at the store.  I picked up and installed all of them last night.  The difference is amazing! :shock:  My workshop is much brighter.  The train room looks like it is being bathed in sunlight. I am very happy with this decision.  

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Mark Boyce posted:

That Outlook problem sure was a mess.  

You sure can’t have too much light!

It still is a mess.  We're not out of the woods, yet.  

And no, you can't have too much light.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 9/18/2018:

This update is a real mixed bag.

Finally, I think the Outlook disaster is over.   I am now running Microsoft Office 2016, including new versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint.  I must say that it is much slower than the previous version (why am I not surprised?).  Anyway, most of my e-mails have survived intact.

I took my shot at weathering the "shorty" pier.  I didn't like how it turned out and have since removed the weathering powders.  I am studying my photos and will try again.  I might even take a photo expedition to get a closer view.

PeirWeathering_001_PeirWeathering_002_PeirWeathering_003_

I also built a couple of bridge pedestals.  I'm actually going to need a few more (maybe 5).

Pedestals_001_Pedestals_003_Pedestals_005_

Next, I took a stab at weathering the bridge shoes and pedestals. I'm much happier with this effort.

PeirWeathering_004_

And finally, I installed the new light bulbs. Here are a few photos under the new lights.  The 4100K bulbs are more like sunlight than the standard 2700K lights.  I like the effect.

NewLighting_001_NewLighting_002_NewLighting_004_

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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George, Remember that cataract surgeries I had last fall?  Well with better vision because of it, coupled with the 4100K lights, I had to put my sunglasses on to see your room photographs!  

It is good to see progress in that train room of yours!  I'm always glad to follow along.

Mark Boyce posted:

George, Remember that cataract surgeries I had last fall?  Well with better vision because of it, coupled with the 4100K lights, I had to put my sunglasses on to see your room photographs!  

It is good to see progress in that train room of yours!  I'm always glad to follow along.

I’m glad the cataract surgery had the desired results.

Outlook 2016 is the gift that keeps on giving- it’s painfully slow and my calendar was wiped out (I am rebuilding my appointments).

I’m debating uninstalling it and reverting to 2007.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Mark Boyce posted:

Ouch!  That is bad!  I can see you may want to go back to Outlook 2007.

Well, the problem is two-fold.  First, the real cause of the issue was the corruption of the PST file.  That was caused by repeated importing of e-mails from the server (think 13,000 messages repeatedly loaded).  That drove the size of the PST file past what Outlook 2007 could handle.  The file got corrupted.  Attempts to repair it were cumbersome, time-consuming, and ultimately successful.  However, there were casualties - like the calendar.  Calendars and e-mail messages are kept in separate PST files.  I didn't even know the calendar PST was damaged.  Anyway, my entries for the next 3 months (maybe longer) are just gone.  I've got e-mails for things in 1969 (didn't know about them  ) and a reminder to file my PA taxes in 2743!  

Second, Outlook 2016 just seems to be very slow.  A video I just saw comparing 2010 and 2016 shows that significantly larger amounts of resources are consumed by 2016.  Wish I'd seen that on Monday.

The bottom line is that the damage has been done.  Even if I de-install Outlook 2016, I really need to shrink the PST file and update the calendar.  My hope is that performance will improve.  If not, then I need to pray that a reversion to Outlook 2007 will go smoothly and yield a running e-mail system.  It's a tough call.

And all of this is really keeping me from doing much, if any, modeling.    I really didn't count on doing my IT support in my retirement.

OK, I'm done venting now.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

I was thinking about that.  What is gone is gone.  2007 won't help there, but I do hate buying a computer and the updates make it obsolete before its time!  I know, I'm tired of IT support too!  Vent away!  We are with you!

One good this is you won't have to worry about forgetting you 2743 State Income Taxes!  Those bums in Harrisburg want to collect in advance I guess!   

Updated 9/20/2018:

Finally, some answers.  Due to the large number of deep puddles, my wife and I hiked into the area just short of the former Weirton Junction location.  Crossing over the tracks, we went south parallel to the river bank.  We couldn't get very close because of swampy conditions, poison ivy, and dense growth.  However, we did get enough close-up photos to learn that the short pier is made of poured concrete, just like the pocket and mid-stream ones. 

Bridge3_003_Bridge3_006_Bridge3_007_Bridge3_013_Bridge3_016_Bridge3_018_

We had just hiked back to the car and were changing our shoes when 2 Norfolk Southern pick-up trucks rolled by on their way to Weirton Junction.  They parked next to the tracks and these men were soon joined by some sort of track maintenance equipment on the track.  As we had an appointment, we didn't stick around.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Mark Boyce posted:

Are you going to model it in a more pristine condition, just weathered but without the crumbling concrete and bushes since you are taking us back in time with the Weirton Steel and city scenery?

Yes, the piers will be in much better shape.  In 1953 the majority of them were only 28 years old.  So no crumbling concrete.  No bushes growing out of the tops of the piers.  There will be weathering and the effects of dirt, flooding, soot, and air pollution.  PRR track maintenance was in full effect.  That means manicured right of ways and raked ballast with straight lines (no mechanical ballasting machines scattering rocks everywhere).

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Updated 9/22/2018:

For reference purposes, here is my pine paint board.

IMG_2048

Regarding the piers (West to East), here are my current thoughts and intentions:

  • Western abutment:  The prototype actually has an abutment built into the hillside and a short pier in front of it (see photo), but I'm invoking modeler's license and putting them together.  I am also using stone (peel-n-stick PITA stuff) on the wall behind the abutment.

WesternPier_001_

  • Pocket Pier (OH side): This pier is on land and as such is much dirtier than those in the river. I am planning to paint it with the Desert Bisque textured paint. The top ring will get a concrete color (wash). The rest will receive weathering, rust, and enhancement of the seams between the rings. Final thing will be a shot of Dullcote.

WesternPier_002_

  • Mid-stream Pier (OH side): This is the westernmost pier actually in the river. The top ring will get a concrete color wash (#2 on my pine board). The rest of the prototype pier is lighter in color, more of a washed out, bleached concrete color. It will get the light gray (#1 on my pine board) wash. Vertical runs of rust will also be applied with weathering powder. Dullcote will fix everything in place. 

IMG18

  • Mid-stream Pier (WV side):  This full-sized pier is also in the river. It will receive the same treatment as the other mid-stream pier.

WesternPier_004_

  • "Shorty" Pier (WV side): This is the first WV side pier that sits on land.  As the photos proved the other day, it is also constructed using poured concrete rings.  However, like the Steubenville pocket pier, it is darker in color (dirty).  It has been painted with the Desert Bisque textured paint (see photo below).  The top ring (currently masked with tape) will get a concrete color (wash).  The rest will receive weathering and some rust.  Finally, I will hit it with a spray of Dullcote.

WesternPier_005_

  • Eastern abutment:  This is the stone arch bridge that dates from at least the 2nd bridge on the site (maybe it is part of the 1st, I don't know).  The photo below shows the arch on its end being test fitted with a piece of the truss bridge.  This was taken prior to putting the stone facing on it.

Benchwork_126_

More when I know it.   

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Updated 9/22/2018 (PM):

After seeing how well the "shorty" pier turned out, I've decided to paint the OH side pocket pier the same color, although I will add more of a darker wash to it afterwards. But before I could paint, I needed to do some prep work.

First, I installed the navigation warning lights (Evans Design U3TR - slowly flashing red 3mm LED bulb). The light is supported by a short piece of shrink wrap and taped in place on the pier. The wires go down through the hole in the pier and emerge below it. Eventually, I will extend those wires. When the pier rests on river bench work, I will drill holes through the river panel, and connect the wires to the 12VDC accessory bus.

PierWork_001_

Next, I glued the spacers in place. They will support the floor of the pier, which in turn will support the bridge pedestal and bridge shoe.

PierWork_003_

The floor lays on top the spacers.

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This photo shows both of the completed navigation light installations. Note the wires at bottom of the pier (indicated by the craft sticks).

PierWork_003_1

Finally, I masked off the top ring of each arm and the lights. 

PierWork_004_1

Now we're ready to paint.

More when I know it.  

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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