Old New York

mlaughlinnyc posted:

That was more than a train show at Hoboken.  It was one of the great O gauge model railroads of all time, the New York Society of Model Engineers.  

My father and I made the pilgrimage from the Bronx on more than one occasion to this layout.  Subway, bus, and then the ferry ride made it quite a day. Good memories!

Jim

At the turn of the century , the Els in Brooklyn were being consolidated into a single system which came to be known as the Brooklyn Rapid Transit or BRT. BRT's focus at the time was to expand its operations into Manhattan and to increase capacity and services using the East River crossings existing, under construction or planned. 

The Williamsburg Bridge opened for traffic in 1903. Initially Trolleys from the company's B&QT company which was the streetcar arm of BRT operated across the Bridge into an Underground Manhattan Terminal. El operations across the bridge were also planned but not in operation when the Bridge opened in 1903.

BRT engineers and management had an interest in loop operation and design similar to that hich was operating in Chicago. The Sands Street complex utilized a loop concept for trains ending their runs in downtown Brooklyn . The theory and rsults achieved that since it was unnecessary to change ends when the train reach its last stop, the dwell time was reduced which meant the terminal could accommodate more trains in a given time period. At the turn of the century, The BRT envisioned , planned and actually began construction on a large loop system which would tie together its trackage and terminals at the Manhattan and Brooklyn ends of each of the three bridges, Brooklyn , Manhattan and Williamsburg. A Multitrack El line was planned in Manhattan running on Center Street . The El structure was actually in place on the Williamsburg bridge on the Manhattan side when the bridge opened in 1903. New York City fought the plan insisting on a Subway route. The City prevailed and the Center street El never came topass.

Here is a photo showing the Williamsburg Bridhg Manhatta side with the El structure in place. 

WB Bridge Manhattan 1906

And on the Brooklyn side, The Sands street terminal was already in place but never fully used as the BRT had envisioned. 

 

Sand street

LIRR Steamer

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LIRR Steamer posted:

At the turn of the century , the Els in Brooklyn were being consolidated into a single system which came to be known as the Brooklyn Rapid Transit or BRT. BRT's focus at the time was to expand its operations into Manhattan and to increase capacity and services using the East River crossings existing, under construction or planned. 

The Williamsburg Bridge opened for traffic in 1903. Initially Trolleys from the company's B&QT company which was the streetcar arm of BRT operated across the Bridge into an Underground Manhattan Terminal. El operations across the bridge were also planned but not in operation when the Bridge opened in 1903.

BRT engineers and management had an interest in loop operation and design similar to that hich was operating in Chicago. The Sands Street complex utilized a loop concept for trains ending their runs in downtown Brooklyn . The theory and rsults achieved that since it was unnecessary to change ends when the train reach its last stop, the dwell time was reduced which meant the terminal could accommodate more trains in a given time period. At the turn of the century, The BRT envisioned , planned and actually began construction on a large loop system which would tie together its trackage and terminals at the Manhattan and Brooklyn ends of each of the three bridges, Brooklyn , Manhattan and Williamsburg. A Multitrack El line was planned in Manhattan running on Center Street . The El structure was actually in place on the Williamsburg bridge on the Manhattan side when the bridge opened in 1903. New York City fought the plan insisting on a Subway route. The City prevailed and the Center street El never came topass.

Here is a photo showing the Williamsburg Bridhg Manhatta side with the El structure in place. 

WB Bridge Manhattan 1906

And on the Brooklyn side, The Sands street terminal was already in place but never fully used as the BRT had envisioned. 

 

Sand street

The second pic is not the Williamsburg Bridge at all.  That is the Manhattan Bridge in the center, and the Brooklyn Bridge at the extreme left.  Sands St. is in Downtown Brooklyn, not in Williamsburg. 

Sorry if I misled anyone. The story intent was to discuss the overall BRT plan of a large loop system which would have connected the three East River crossings on both the Manhattan and the Brooklyn side. The first part of this plan was the Park Row terminal, the proposed Southern end of the loop in Manhattan , the Brooklyn Bridge crossing and on the Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge , the Sands Street complex which was the proposed Southern end of the loop in Brooklyn. This part of the plan was operational prior to completion of El service on the Williamsburg Bridge. The plan as an El Loop never went any further than this development because of the City's insistence on a Centre st Subway in Manhattan alternate plan. 

The Centre st subway did ultimately lead to the completion of a Loop service configuration using the Manhattan Bridge The Nassau St extension and the Montague st Tunnel with the Dekalb Ave complex in Brooklyn. The Eastern division operations would use the Centre St Subway to reach downtown Manhattan through Chambers St. The P_ark Row, Brooklyn Bridge Sand Street part of the loop scheme became superfluous and was removed form service by 1944. 

LIRR Steamer

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